Interview with COOKIESFORTHEROAD

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Read Time:6 Minute, 51 Second

The Pandemic has taught us a lot! First of all, regardless of our culture, nationality, skin color, religion, etc… we are all connected in this social ecosystem. We are all humans sticking together on the same planet, and social media platforms (with all their downfalls), allow us to interact and engage with people from all around the globe. Second, we shouldn’t take people for granted. We think only famous and rich artists are worthy of being listened to, but we forget, that emerging artists have a great deal to share with the world and their public. It is their courage and resolve that prove they are the best to guide us in the path of learning. We should care about our artist fellows because their struggle is our struggle. Sharing experiences can strengthen our sense of community and will help us to engage with local art and reflect on our experiences. We are not alone!

With that said, I think we must confess that having conversations with strangers about arts, movies, literature, food, TikToks, or travels has become a daily routine for most of us. It could be really surprising to meet people with great vibes and personalities. COOKIESFORTHEROAD is a friend I met on Instagram while scrolling through #collages. I loved the simplicity of his work: there were these visual compositions that looked like a silhouette expressing a silent dream. Uncomplicated lines can send a powerful message! I must say I am a loyal follower and in the coming days, we shared a few conversations: behind the screen there was this kind and friendly guy who was really easy to talk to. I was curious to learn more about him so here I am, sharing with you this little conversation hoping to discover more about his creative process. 

Enjoy this reading and stay true to yourselves!

1. Hello, my friend! First of all, we are curious about your nickname: why “COOKIESFORTHEROAD”?
I happen to be a huge fan of the Hip Hop group, Atmosphere and «cookies for the road» is a lyric from one of my favortite songs by them, Fuck You Lucy. In close second was «the last night of the fair» which is a lyric from the song Rusholme Ruffians by The Smiths. I ultimately settled on COOKIESFORTHEROAD since at that time the cookie policy agreement on websites was becoming more prevelent and I was constantly seeing it pop up on my screen as I worked and well, in my own interpretation, cookies are remnants of people and things we want to remember since at the time I had also become quite obsessed with David Lowery’s film, A Ghost Story and if you’ve seen it you know the main character, a ghost, just lingers and can’t seem to let go of all of the memories and people he’d been forced to leave behind after his untimely passing. Which, of course, explains the ghost as my logo.

Image courtesy of Cookiesfortheroad

2. Which are your earliest memories of interest in arts in general?
The very first instances I can recall of becoming interested in the arts are from my early years of elementary school. In Kindergarten, I remember wearing one of my father’s old plaid shirts for a class painting session outside in the school’s courtyard. I can still vividly remember being covered in paint and even the distinct smell of the paper on which we painted on. Definitely one of those moments from your life that get bookmarked in your brain and you revisit from time to time.

3. When did you know you wanted to be an artist?
I honestly believe it was at that very moment in my Kindergarten class. After that, I would marvel at any and every opportunity I got to color or draw wether it was at school or at home. By the following school year my teacher had already enrolled me in photography classes in our school’s extension program to further my artistic inclinations.

4. In Latinoamerica, artists struggle to survive. Is it difficult to make a living from being an emerging musician/artist in the U.S.A?
Absolutely. Here in the U.S.A. we have a name for this – starving artist. This term used to describe the material scrifices one makes when deciding to persue any form of art as a career. I did in fact attend a College for art and entertainment technology, but soon after found out I would not be able to make a livable wage on graphic design work alone. So, for the last 20 years I’d been bartending at various bars and live music venues in Hollywood and was forced to put designing on the backburner. It was only until the Pandemic surged last year in March and most of the Los Angeles service industry businesses were forced to shut their doors and I found myself without a job, that I attempted to make art my full time gig since I could do it all from home. I had been completely focused on that for over a year but, recently once again found myself needing to take a bartending job in order to make a proper living.

5. I have seen your artwork, and I can tell you are very passionate about it. What do you enjoy most about creating digital designs and collages?
Throughout my artistic journey I have included and worked with all sorts of mediums and in fact used to do collaging using only images from magazines and old books. But, for some time now I have enjoyed the freedom to manipulate compositions in their digital form. I have also found that I can be much more expressive since the pool of source material online is virtually endless.

6. What inspired you to start making music?
In my early 20s, my then teenage sibling took an interest in Hip Hop and specifically rapping. I had already started DJing by this point and so, learning to produce beats and tracks for my brother to rap over, was a natural progression for me. This lead to me working with other local artists and even creating music together with people I’d only met online.

7. Have you ever participated in a music festival or performance?
On a smaller scale, yes. One of the artists I was producing for back then performed all over Los Angeles in places such as The Derby in Los Feliz and The House of Blues in West Hollywood and I would DJ as well as do live improvisations for all of his sets. It was such a magical time for me. I was designing all of the show flyers and posters and got a chance to be on stage and thus feeding my creative hunger.

8. We know you have Mexican ancestry. Have you been inspired by your Mexican roots or would you like to experiment with the influence of it in the future?
Although my Mexican heritage is an enormous part of my identity, I do feel that I have yet to really bring that aspect in to my creative process in a significant way. I would definitely like to make it more of a focal point moving forward and as a matter of fact have been gathering up some ideas for specific projects I will be working on in the near future.

9. What advice would you give to young people on how to make a difference in the world?
First and foremost, I would tell them to strive to be good stewards of this planet we all share and live on. Altruism is the highest form of morality in my opinion. Secondly, I would remind them to never be afraid to share their gifts with one another. We are all different and yet can find commonalities in such things as creativity and art.

10. Last but not least: what quote would you like to share with our readers?
«We are the music makers and we are the dreamers of dreams» – excerpt from the poem Ode by Arthur O’Shaughnessy


If you want to learn more about “COOKIESFORTHEROAD” and his art follow and show love at: 
https://instagram.com/cookiesfortheroad

Image courtesy of Cookiesfortheroad
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